complexurban /

Complexity, Planning & Urbanism

New MArch Atelier at the Manchester School of Architecture: Developing new theoretical approaches & computational tools using a complexity science framework (systems, self-organisation, emergence, intelligence, structural change, adaptation) for the design, management, governance and understanding of future cities related to climate change, citizen participation, development strategies, resilient interventions, policy making, urban morphology and capacity management.

Navigate +

Round Table with Michael Weinstock, Michael Batty & Gert de Roo: AESOP Planning & Complexity 12

AESOP Planning & Complexity 12: Confronting Urban Planning & Design with Complexity: Methods for Inevitable Transformation

ROUND TABLE:

Professor Michael Weinstock Professor Michael Batty Professor Gert de Roo

THEME:

Urban transformation has increasingly become recognised as both inevitable and complex. Processes of urban change can take various forms, from evolutionary to emergent, and are driven by trans-scalar and dynamic relationships ranging from policy and infrastructure to local and bottom up agency. Working with these complexities requires innovative new approaches and tools which can incorporate and utilise the inherent potentials of urban change. These could support spatial planners and designers in managing transformation and retaining dynamics and adaptability within systems.

Processes of urban transformation incorporate multiple and parallel assemblages of dynamic change. It is often within the comparative timelines of the processes of change and the differences between the types of transformation, that opportunities for intervention and management in such processes can be identified and negotiated. With this in mind, spatial planners and designers of the urban realm are asked to demonstrate, identify and propose innovative approaches and methodologies which utilise complexity as the filter through which morphological urban processes can be addressed in a variety of ways, from spatial acupuncture and pattern formulation, to stakeholder negotiation and policy design.

This event is aimed at exploring more closely the potentials and parallels between processes of Spatial Planning and Urbanism/Design. In particular, how the complexity sciences can create and enhance this discourse through an examination of processes of inevitable transformation. Papers may address: •The relation between processes of planning, urban spatial design, urban transformation and complexity; •Approaches and tools to work with on-going and inevitable urban transformation; •The potential of utilising multiple timelines and dynamic relationships between spatial development processes to enhance planning and design methodologies; •Complexity as the basis for communication and collaboration between planners, designers and policy makers.

MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Manchester School of Architecture (MSA) is an innovative collaboration between Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) and The University of Manchester (UoM), uniting two schools of architecture with over 100 years of educational experience to create one of the largest architecture schools in the UK.

MSA is consistently ranked as one of the best architecture schools in the UK and offers a range of professionally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.  During its time MSA has gained a reputation for the variety, vitality and quality of the work and achievements of its students.  This is not only reflected in appraisals by the professional institutions, the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and the Royal Institute for British Architects (RIBA), but also by the number and variety of prizes gained externally.

Architectural research at the MSA is intrinsically interdisciplinary and broadly conceived, encompassing areas as diverse as urban design, urban development, ecological and landscape design and the conservation and management of historic environments.  This research is carried out mainly within the recently established Manchester Architecture Research Centre (MARC). The centre draws upon a wide range of interdisciplinary research and teaching interests within the School of Environment, Education and Development, the Faculty of Humanities of The University of Manchester and the Manchester School of Art at Manchester Metropolitan University.  The opportunities for collaborative architectural research across the two universities are unparalleled and research bids in a variety of disciplines are strengthened by the involvement of strong architectural researchers.

Organiser: Ulysses Sengupta (Senior Lecturer, MSA)

12 February 2014
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,